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Wartime Veterans

Wartime Veterans Benefits

Wartime Periods and Their Impact on Your Ability to Receive Veterans Disability Benefits

WWII  |  Korean War  |  Vietnam War  |  Persian Gulf War  |  OEF OIF

Your ability to receive Veterans Disability compensation depends in large part on whether your disability is “service-connected.”  Service connection generally means that a chronic disability arose coincidental with military service.  The wartime period in which you served may have specific disabling conditions that have been identified as being service-connected.

WWII Veterans
  • World War II:  Exposure to radiation was common due to the extensive experimentation and nuclear testing of the Atomic Bomb. Diseases such as Leukemia, Lymphomas, Multiple Myeloma and Cancers could later manifest in veterans who were exposed to radiation at that time.  Click here to read more details about WWII Veterans Disability Benefits.
Korea Veterans Vietnam Veterans
  • Vietnam:  Exposure to Agent Orange, the herbicide used to kill off dense plant life caused multiple conditions in veterans of that war. Twelve specific illnesses have been identified as service-connected disabilities.  Click here to read more details about Vietnam Veterans Disability Benefits.
OEF OIF Veterans

Note: All representation coordinated by Alpha is provided by our employees, the Advocates, who are accredited by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). No private organization that trains and employs accredited agents has been legally recognized by the VA for the purposes of preparation, presentation, and prosecution of claims. This work must be done by the Advocates themselves and not organizations.

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15 comments to “Wartime Veterans”

  • willie smith, October 13, 2010 at 11:42 am

    I’am a gulf war vet.Since I’ve left the service I have asthma congestive heart failure. I believe this due to my time during the Persian Gulf War.Currently being treated at my local VA hospital

  • Allen Gumpenberger - Alpha Veterans Disability Advocate, October 13, 2010 at 4:47 pm

    Interesting. It is highly possible that the environmental hazards in the Persian Gulf area contributed to the development of your breathing problems and your heart problems. I recommend that you call in to arrange a telephone interview with one of our advocates to discuss a strategy on your particular case. Call us at 877.611.7724. Thanks for contacting us.

  • tc, June 5, 2011 at 6:25 pm

    I was wondering if you were in the service during wartime but did not engage in war, would it be possibly to contract some of the same disease and symptoms of the soldiers in th war zone

  • Alpha, June 6, 2011 at 9:56 am

    tc,
    Yes it is possible. It depends on the illness and the etiology of that illness. For example, veterans who served in Vietnam who never engaged in a combat role were still exposed to Agent Orange which is now known to cause a host of illnesses, like prostate cancer, diabetes, and ischemic heart disease.

  • BB, June 10, 2011 at 10:19 pm

    I GOT HOME FROM IRAQ IN APR 2004. TRY TO HAVE A CHILD AND FIND OUT MY SPERM COUNT IS GRADUALLY DROPPING. IT’S CRAZY THAT YOU TIME LINE IT BACK TO A NORMAL COUNT WOULD BE JUST WHEN I GOT HOME. WE HAD TO DO INVITRO AND IT WORKED, BUT NOW MY COUNT IS UNCOUNTABLE. HAVE YOU HEARD OF ANY OTHER STORIES LIKE THAT? I KNOW WE HAD A IED GO OFF CLOSE AND WE WERE TOLD THERE WAS SARIN GAS IN IT. COULD I BE HELPED BY THE VA FOR PAST EXPENSES?

  • Alpha, June 13, 2011 at 2:36 pm

    BB
    Coincidental onset of a disability or condition is generally all that is required for entitlement to service connection. If you have medical proof that your condtion originated while on active duty, you could potentially get a special monthly compensation benefit.

  • Robert J. Keenan, June 17, 2011 at 12:28 pm

    I am a 67 year old combat vietnam veteran with cancer of the bladder and kidneys. I am currently receiving a disability benifit of %60 for
    PTSD and loss of hearing. My question is will my wife be entiled to
    collect part of the disability benifit when I die.

  • Alpha, June 17, 2011 at 2:30 pm

    Robert,
    Your wife would get benefits only if your death is related to your military service. You should consider working with us to help you get your combined rating to at least 100 percent. Contact us if you think you’d like to try to do this.

  • Jessica, August 16, 2011 at 1:31 pm

    My husband and I served in Irag in 06-07. Last year my husband was diagnosed with end stage heart failure which was within the one year mark of leaving active duty. He was very healthy and never got sick. He currently has a Left Ventricular Assist Device and is waiting for a heart transplant. This came out of no where. He was working out one day and when he got into bed later that night he began coughing uncontrollably. He spiralled down hill after that. We are working on a claim and am hopeful for full disability. State toxicology thought maybe cobalt cardiomyopathy because my husband salvaged blownup gun trucks that were hit by IEDs and EFPs. He lso was installing the new FRAG5 kits in 06-07. Although we probably will never figure out what has caused the idiology of my husband’s illness, I’m wondering if there are other soldiers out there with similar issues.

  • Alpha, August 22, 2011 at 4:58 pm

    Jessica,
    We have seen heart problems in veterans returning from Iraq. There should be a tie-in to exposure. Maybe one of our advocates can help you both out.

  • Norman Neal, September 9, 2011 at 2:35 pm

    I am drill status guardsman with the Air National Guard. I was called to active duty Oct 2001 and was released August 2003 back to drill status. I have also gone back to Suadi and Oman on 30 day TDY’s. In November 2010 I was diagnosed with Asthma, and Sleep Apnea. I wake up almost daily with headaches. I believe my symptoms have come about due to my time in the Persian Gulf. I was in Kuwait at the start of the Iraqi invasion.

  • Alpha, September 12, 2011 at 11:12 am

    Norman,
    It would be worth it to check in with us to discuss if your medical problems could be service-connected. If interested in our advocacy please call 877-611-7724.

  • Dennis Kocher, April 10, 2013 at 2:06 pm

    I served from 1962-1963 at Hopedale AFS Labrador. In 1968 the base was closed by the USA’s Environmental Protection Agency as being a contaminated toxic PCB site. In the past 10 yrs I’ve had 12 skin cancer surgeries by VA surgeons and 13 biopsies in one day. Currently in the process of filing a VA claim for compensation. The medical compensation review physician at Reno has determined that my cancer is directly related to my active duty at Hopedale. I filed last June and received notice that a final decision has been made but now awaiting the package outlining benefits or denial. Any idea how long it takes for the VA to make notification?

  • Alpha, April 15, 2013 at 3:56 pm

    Dennis,

    Even though they made a decision (adjudicated) it still needs to be promulgated. This means the formal process has to be completed which includes how much money they may owe you and how much you may receive each month. This process could take as long as a week to months. There is no set time limit to this process.

  • ROBERT VANN WILSON, May 9, 2013 at 5:06 pm

    give the 100% disabled the money your waisting on fereighn aid they earned it

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